INTRODUCING: Brilliant or Blunder Action Guide

INTRODUCING … Brilliant or Blunder Action Guide (2017) the learning manual for putting Success Mindsets to work for your organization. This recently published companion to the original text, Brilliant or Blunder: Navigating Uncertainty, Opportunity, (2014) brings detail and clarity for implementation of the methodology and processes unique to developing Success Mindsets.

Businesses today are under pressure to make better decisions, and make them quickly against a backdrop of dynamically changing environments. Leaders are called upon to confront challenges that challenge their ability to deliver results. Breakthroughs surface from this new framework built on situational mastery. To confront changing realities, leaders must learn to think critically and become mentally agile. Do we need smarter thinking? Our dynamic work environments offer new opportunities, and new risks, that were largely unknown just a few decades past. Clear analysis is more vital than ever.

The Brilliant or Blunder Action Guide comes at the request of professors who adopted the original book as the text for their courses, and by leaders who needed a manual to aide in implementing Success Mindsets in their organizations.  It outlines the steps to master situational awareness, critical analysis and breakthrough thinking to ensure that the right decision is made at the right time for the right results. Both Brilliant or Blunder and the companion guide are available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all your favorite book sites.

Please visit www.brilliantorblunder.com to get a free chapter and watch a one minute video on the Success Mindsets Framework. For further information, please contact Mary Lippitt, Founder, Enterprise Management Ltd. via email info@enterprisemgt.com.

 

Preparing For What’s Next: Leveraging Your Company’s Life Cycle

By Dr. Mary Lippitt | December 15, 2016business lifecycle

What are you focusing on now? After a successful launch, entrepreneurs have a choice. They can sit back and continue to do what they have done so far or they can recognize the need to prepare for what comes next. Too often entrepreneurs make the wrong choice to stay the course using the logic “why mess with success.” However there is good reason to refocus based on changing realities. Mark Twain’s comment that even if you are on the right track you will get run over if you just sit there. And we know that 50% of new businesses fail. To ensure sustained success, leaders must adopt a strategic perspective based on industry trends and their organization’s life cycle. Everyone knows the value of using the product or project life cycle and overlook the impact of the organization’s cycle. Learn how to leverage the six organizational stages to seize new opportunities and avoid pitfalls. Here’s my recent Interview on this important topic, as conducted by Marcia Zidle, host of The Business Edge:

Preparing for What’s Next: Leveraging Your Company’s Life Cycle

First Published at:  https://www.bizcatalyst360.com/preparing-for-whats-next-leveraging-your-companys-life-cycle/

Motivational Power: Who Wants to be a Donkey?!

By Mary Lippitt | April 12, 2011Motivation Leadership

It’s time to update the carrot and stick approach. A cartoon of a donkey hitched to a wagon with a stick in front of it with a carrot enticing the donkey highlights the problem of trying to influence action without thinking about ramifications.

For centuries, dangling the carrot in front of the hardworking donkey or threatening the animal with the stick were two types of motivational power leaders used. Just as technology has advanced, we must expand this narrow view. Encouraging our leaders to rise to the challenges of new workforce expectations, requirements, and levels of competition requires more than a carrot or a stick.

Employee motivation, be it positive or negative, is a direct result of the appropriate use of power by a leader. Power is a bit of a dirty word that inspires a love-hate relationship. On one hand, it is connected to strength, forward motion and inspiration. On the other, it is often connected to despots, tyrants and evil bosses. The love, or carrot, of power reflects the ability to motivate others to achieve goals. The negative, or stick, stems from the forceful use of power over others that yields distorted behavior, corrupted decision making, or reduced initiative. Bearing both of these associations in mind, the use of power accomplishes goals and stirs engagement among employees.

While it is convenient to only have to evaluate two options: punish or reward, motivating both people and animals is much more complicated. The assumption is that we are just a “dumb” means to accomplish a goal diminishes us to the single task of cart hauling.

The fast reaction to the carrot or stick overshadows more sustainable options. Everyone may welcome a bonus but after a month, what is the power of the monetary incentive? Feeling like your contributions led to successful goal achievement, a sense that people trust and respect your experience, or the recognition that your insights made a critical difference in gaining support offers long lasting benefits.

How have you reacted when a “stick” strategy is evident? What motivates you? What type of motivational power have you used to bring out the best in others?